Music and Exercise - EffectsofMusiconExercise Performance...

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Effects of Music on Exercise  Performance Brian Shaw, Chandler Young, Justine Whitley, Lauren Post, Katie Perlberg, Ashlea Poirot, Alyssa Cantu
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Move to the Music Haile Gebrselassie, the Olympian from Ethiopia who has won the gold medal at 10,000 meters, and currently holds the Marathon world record time (02:03:59) often requested that the techno song “Scatman,” which has a B.P.M. of around 135, be played over the sound system during his races.
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Topics of Discussion 1. Music Before Exercise 2. Music During Exercise 3. RPE in Trained v. Untrained 4. Loudness Levels in General Pop. 5. Distractions and Obesity intervention 6. Parkinson’s Disease 7. COPD Patients
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Effects of pre-exercise music listening: fast vs. slow rhythm •Listened to fast or slow music for 20 minutes before exercise •Cycled for 45 seconds at supramaximal intensity •Effects on metabolic variables –Prior to music listening epinephrine levels increased with FAST music –Norepinephrine levels in the blood decreased with SLOW music –No effect on lactate or ammonia levels –No significant impact on power output during exercise
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500m Rowing Sprint Three 500m sprints - No music - Slow music - Fast Music (2 x the speed) Tested - Rate of perceived fatigue (Borg’s RPE Scale) - Levels of Arousal (Strokes per minute) - Motor coordination and synchronization (Time to completion)
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Results RPE did not change based on condition in these trained athletes - Focus on internal cues, not environment at high intensity Strokes per minute increased with fast tempo music - Stimulating or “psych- up” effect - Subconscious or semi- conscious level Time to completion decreased with both fast and slow tempo music when compared to the control group - Synchronizing may not be the reason for performance enhancing effects - Result of Effort?
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Results No music Slow music Fast music Time to completion (seconds) 107.4 106.75 105.3 Strokes per minute 33.0 33.3 35.0
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This note was uploaded on 06/20/2011 for the course CHEM 369 taught by Professor Hoffman during the Spring '11 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Music and Exercise - EffectsofMusiconExercise Performance...

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