Physiology of a vegetarian diet-1

Physiology of a vegetarian diet-1 - PHYSIOLOGY OF A...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PHYSIOLOGY OF A VEGETARIAN DIET Claire Hall, Austin Drake, Erica Lara, Breigh Morgan, Brandon Stewart, Ellen Browne, Hayley Hodges
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Outline What is a vegetarian diet? Aerobic performance Anaerobic performance Cardiovascular effects Body composition The female athlete Conclusion
Background image of page 2
What is a vegetarian diet? Vegetarian comes from the Latin word “vegetus,” meaning “whole, sound, fresh, or lively” Diet represents a balanced philosophical and moral awareness of life for most people Offers several health benefits Each person must plan out their diet in order to obtain needed nutrients
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What is a vegetarian diet? Vegan: only plant-based foods Lacto-vegetarian: only dairy products (no eggs) and plant products Lacto-ovo vegetarian: only dairy products and eggs and plants Ovo-vegetarian: only plant foods and eggs
Background image of page 4
What is a vegetarian diet? Semi-vegetarians: only chicken and fish, plant foods, dairy products (including eggs) Other variations include: H Macrobiotic: restricts animal products, no processed or refined foods H Fruitarian: only raw fruits, nuts, and seeds that can be obtained without damaging the plant
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What is a vegetarian diet?
Background image of page 6
Effects of Anaerobic Performance
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Iron Deficiency Insufficient iron intake and poor absorption are the leading causes of poor iron status Vegetarian diets have low-absorption rates for iron, so they are more prone to having decreased endurance In some cases, vegetarian diets may require iron supplementation to build or maintain iron stores If taking supplements, iron levels should be monitored due to the association between iron status and chronic disease
Background image of page 8
Muscle Mass Muscle mass depends on the athlete’s size, composition, gender, training regimen, and activity pattern, but it has been shown that vegetarians have a lower body mass index and a lower percentage of body fat It can be harder for them to gain muscle because of the decreased calorie intake in their diet
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Creatine Supplementation Many tests have been done on creatine supplementation in their diets, most people get it from meat and fish, so vegetarians have to get it by other means They usually have lower levels of creatine in their blood, urine, and red blood cells naturally Studies have shown that when they take creatine supplements it has increased their muscle mass and performance
Background image of page 10
Creatine Supplementation So far there are not long-term affects associated with taking creatine supplements Some subjects have complained about muscle cramps and tears, but no further problems in the future People with kidney disease are warned when taking creatine however While it is not a must that weightlifters take creatine supplements it has been found to be both safe and an indication of increased performance
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Overall Performance It has been shown that vegetarians do in fact have decreased anaerobic performance and output than of those people on a diet with meat and poultry
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/20/2011 for the course CHEM 369 taught by Professor Hoffman during the Spring '11 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 46

Physiology of a vegetarian diet-1 - PHYSIOLOGY OF A...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online