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lec6.1 - 139 Lecture 14 CHAPTER 6 HYPOTHESIS TESTING...

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139 Lecture 14: CHAPTER 6: HYPOTHESIS TESTING Example: Consider the population of weights (in kg) of all newborn babies in Canada for a particular year. In this case, the Population Mean is the average weight of all newborns in the population. An investigator may want to use a simple random sample of these weights to determine if there is sufficient evidence to answer questions like: Is > 3.2 kg? or Is < 3.2 kg? or Is 3.2 kg? Example: Consider the population of all lakes in Nova Scotia. A biologist may be interested in the following population proportion : = the proportion of all lakes in Nova Scotia that are seriously affected by acid rain. He/she may want to use a simple random sample of lakes from this population to determine if there is sufficient evidence to answer questions like: Is >.7? or, Is <.7? or, Is .7? When drawing conclusions about a population using information from a sample it is important to realize that one can NEVER be absolutely certain the conclusion is correct. This is because a sample, though it may be “representative” of the population, only contains part of all the information contained in the population.
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