12 angry men - Dustin Johnston July 1, 2010 Twelve Angry...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Dustin Johnston July 1, 2010 Twelve Angry Men Questions 1. There is a great deal of evidence of jury bias against the defendant. This starts at the beginning of the film with the juror’s halo bias (bias that causes you to make final assumptions about the entire persons character based on one piece of information) concerning how the boy grew up in the slums. Several times jurors are heard commenting that you know how “those people” are, “he grew up in the gutter”, “how else could he be”, “he must be a murderer”. This is also the basis of the jury’s primacy bias (bias based on the first time you see a person and make a snap decision about their entire character. Finally, the last type of bias they exhibit is fundamental attribution error bias (bias based on ignoring the facts because of how a person looks). The jury shows this in several ways believing shaky evidence and other facts because the other two aforementioned bias’s 2. Several norms are created early in the film. The jury foreman tries to make everyone speak in order, with no one allowed to speak out of turn but that quickly breaks down and the norm of speaking your mind whenever you want to comes into effect. Other norms that quickly come into
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/20/2011 for the course COM 363 taught by Professor ? during the Spring '10 term at Sam Houston State University.

Page1 / 4

12 angry men - Dustin Johnston July 1, 2010 Twelve Angry...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online