Training for global operations

Training for global operations - Dustin Johnston Training...

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Dustin Johnston Training for Global Operations October 28, 2009
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Chapter 6: Training for Global Operations Global operations is a phrase that would have seemed very out of place less than twenty years ago in all but the largest of international companies. As Thomas L. Friedman likes to say, “The world is becoming increasingly flat and through that increasing flatness competition is becoming more dynamic.” What Friedman means in this statement is that everyday, the world is becoming more interconnected and this interconnectedness is causing each individual, business and even country to depend more and more upon others in its “global community”. Because of these facts, training for international and global operations is becoming not only more important, but essential for everyday functioning. One of the biggest things that must be taken into account when talking about global operations is that more than ninety percent of the training is based around cultural sensitivity and how to operate, speak and not clash with the various cultures that you may encounter. Things like how to walk, talk, whether to bow or shake hands, if you are expected to stand one foot or twenty feet away from the person you are talking to and finally, when the best time to meet with a contact in another part of the world are all part of your cultural orientation. Cultural Divides In their book Kiss, Bow, or Shake Hands, Terri Morrison and Wayne A. Conaway write that before anything else can be considered, we must examine how the culture we
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are about to engage with thinks differently than our own. Cognitive styles can be broken down into three basic categories: whether the culture is open-minded or close-mind, do they rely more on associative or abstract thinking and do they think about the minute details or the big picture. First, whether a culture is more open-minded or close-minded is defined as the difference between a person who, when posed with a fact or question, questions it instantly and needs more outside sources and a person who is willing to take most information they are given at face value. Most cultures with strong central governments, theocracies or powerful and very influential political figures are considered close- minded, while the more liberal democracies are considered open-minded. Surprisingly enough, the United States and Canada are considered close-minded, due to the fact that when posed with a question or statement about their own country, citizens have a very close-minded view and will instantly dismiss statements such as “The United States is evil and should be a Theocracy!” without first considering the other persons point of view. The second category is associative versus abstract thinking. An associative thinker is one who, when presented with new material, instantly compares it to other past experiences, groups it as being related to one of his/her past experiences and rarely, if ever, creates a new group, even when presented with entirely new situations. In contrast,
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This note was uploaded on 06/20/2011 for the course ECO 363 taught by Professor Fred during the Spring '09 term at Sam Houston State University.

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Training for global operations - Dustin Johnston Training...

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