- Urban and industrial slavery Fugitive slave law Disfranchisement Segregation Presentations Geography test II Factories in philly uses lead to

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7/26/2007 Urban and industrial slavery Fugitive slave law Disfranchisement Segregation Presentations Geography test II Factories in philly – uses lead to create glass, colored lead – used by slaves Urban and industrial slavery 200,000 slaves working in industry Textile mills, iron foundries, chemical plants Work with European Americans – worked side by sides Hiring time = earning money – hire themselves out or by master to work in another field, earn extra money to buy freedom, free African Americans right next to them Interaction with free Africa American communities Master’s lack of control – resisted against work – different methods from field slave rebellion, master can’t watch every action of the slaves William Ellison Repair cotton gins and became wealthy Business man Entrepreneur 1970 Skilled slave – repaired gin, made cotton gin White father Not treated as badly – mulatto Once earns freedom – buys his own slaves Changed his name from april to William Trained future blacksmiths Owned large amount of land Slaves didn’t want to work for him Maybe didn’t treat his slaves good Lost his real estate Iron foundry 1880s Enslaves Africans working Near the river Water is important for smelting Ship easily to a city Smelters
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Following the war of 1812 Free African Americans experience swift economic social and political change Market revolution Factories production and commercial farming Transportation revolution – steam boat prior = row boats National road Eric canal – 1825 – easily access from new york to Albany to Mississippi, slaves, immigrants, germans, free people of color Steam powered river vessels railroads 1830s Railroads – slaves make them Foundaries in Tennessee, Virginia, More self sufficient Fugative slave law – 1793 Extended into the north the ability of southern slave holders to enslave African Americans White northerners also limited black freedom using black laws Romantic age Ethnic and racial groups posses own inherent spirit “nearly every northern state considered, and many adopted, measures to prohibit or
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This note was uploaded on 06/20/2011 for the course WRT 102 taught by Professor Frost during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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- Urban and industrial slavery Fugitive slave law Disfranchisement Segregation Presentations Geography test II Factories in philly uses lead to

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