10-24-2007 - Ancient Egypt statues not free stating not...

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Ancient Egypt – statues not free stating – not face relief Kouros – free standing runner – have spaces between arm and legs – not leaning on the stone – very stylized Kritios boy – idea of putting on foot in front of another Realism – hips are down on one side – realism of muscle Polyclitus’ canon – Counterpoise Emperor titus – 799-81 A.D. – roman – derivative of greek sculpture – did not really elaborate on it but continued on with the same style – ideology changes Statues were used as decoration – more social function used for status- raises your profile Focused on ancestral portraits Owes a great deal of verism – latin word for truth – sculptures that were created are made to represent realism. Statues represent and focused on - Gravitas – latin word for gravity Constantia – steadfast Dignitas – dignity Courage Duty (fides) Roman statues – concerned status – therefore roman emperors are also portrayed in statues with great detail. Equestrian statue of emperor marcus aurlius (modern replica)
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10-24-2007 - Ancient Egypt statues not free stating not...

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