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413b - —.¢.— I When a light rag strikes a surface it...

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Unformatted text preview: —.¢.— I When a light rag strikes a surface, it can be reflected, transmitted, or absorbed [transformed into internal energy}. I Depending on whether the surface is smooth or rough, reflection will be either regular {specular} or diffuse, respectively, With regular reflection, the light ray is reflected in only one direction, rather than scattered. The angle of reflection, which is the angle the reflected raw,I males with the normal, equals the angle of incidence. I If the light ragI is transmitted, the light rag can change direction if there is change in the speed of the light as it enters the new medium. This change in the speed of light between media is called refraction. According to Snell ’s Law, the product of the index of refraction in the first medium and the sine of the angle of incidence equals the product of the index of refraction in the second medium and the sine of the angle of refraction. In other words, the greater the index of refraction of the new medium, the smaller the angle of refraction will be. This means that moving from a lower to a higher index of refraction causes the rag to bend towards the normal. it] DHE FORM. WHETHER, REFRAEHDHAPPEARS DH NEARLYEVER’i' CDlilPREHENSWE PH‘I'SIES Eilwsi. TEHJ [ihEFll‘ill'l'EL'iIr WANT TD MEMDRJIE SHELL'S UM". Em .J WHEEL ...
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