Aztec & Greek - Aztec & Greek1 Gender & Roles of the...

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1 Betty Hoist ANT 101 Ronald Bolender 2 August 2009
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2 There are many similarities as well as differences in gender and the roles that are formed for the Aztecs and the Ancient Greeks. Of course a lot of those similarities will depend on exactly what your status is in that culture. For the most part in Greece men ran the government. When they weren’t in politics they were overseeing field work or working the fields themselves. They also hunted, sailed, traded, or worked in manufacturing. The ancient Greeks considered children to be “youths” until they reached the age of thirty. When a child was born to the ancient Greek family, a naked father carried his child in a ritual dance, around the household. The family decorated the doorway of their homes with a wreath of olives for a boy, and a wreath of wool for a girl child. However, it wasn’t all work and no play for the men of Ancient Greece. Men often had drinking parties plus they enjoyed horseback riding and wrestling. The men also participated in the now famous Olympic Games. The Aztec society was also male dominated. The fathers and sons were the glue that held their families together and kept everything in order. Aztec had many Warriors who were usually males and as such were held with great esteem and respect in their society. At the birth of a baby boy they would cut the umbilical cord and give it to a warrior. That Warrior was to go and bury the umbilical cord on a battlefield. It was the boy’s social duty to grow up and be a Warrior. At about age three or four the boy followed his father to learn his skills. If you were a commoner boy you were exposed to warrior training in their local telpochcalli “House of Youth” of the local warrior house. If the boy was of nobility he could look forward to training by priest in a monastery school, or Calmecac.
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3 Now the Greeks also raised male warriors in Sparta. They believed that their duty was to produce soldiers who were disciplined and drilled for the army. The boys left home at the age of seven to undergo a severe training course until the age of eighteen. At the age of eighteen the boys then became cadets where they were schooled in the acts of war. Somewhere between the ages of eighteen and twenty Spartan men had to pass a difficult military test, which included ability, leadership, and fitness. If the test was not passed the men would then become a part of the Middle Class where they would lose their political rights and citizenship. The Middle Class men of Sparta would then own
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This note was uploaded on 06/20/2011 for the course ANT101 ANT101 taught by Professor Nancy during the Summer '10 term at Ashford University.

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Aztec & Greek - Aztec & Greek1 Gender & Roles of the...

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