Pos._Psych._Ch._4_ppt - Leisure, Optimal Experience, and...

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Leisure, Optimal Experience, and Peak Experience Leisure: How we spend our spare time What we do to relax The activities we engage in to have fun and How we exercise our passions and interests Leisure Can be defined as “ life outside of work”.
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cont. Participation in leisure activities ay be the most important contributor to life satisfaction in older women. Higher activity level could be an effective deterrent to damaging effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Increase in aerobic exercise can decrease symptoms of depression and anxiety and increase levels of happiness.
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What Turns an Activity into “Leisure”? Reasons for engaging in leisure: (1) fulfilled needs for autonomy (2) allowed he enjoyment of family life (3) provided for relaxation (4) offered an escape from routine One of the most powerful reasons or leisure activities is the chance to be with other people.
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Flow and Optimal Experience: Being “In The Zone” Definition of Flow Flow denotes the holistic sensation present when we act with total involvement…It is the state in which action follows upon action according to an internal logic which seems to need no conscious intervention on our part. We experience it as a unified flowing from one moment to the next, in which we feel in control of our actions, and in which there is little distinction between self and environment; between stimulus and response; or between past, present, and future.
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Contexts and Situation for Flow Csikszentmihalye (1990) believes that flow is the experience that allows people to enjoy life, fee happier, and function better in a number of different contexts.
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Characteristics of Flow 1. The Merging of Action and Awareness The person does not have to think about what they are doing before they do it. 1. Complete Concentration on the Task at Hand - The concentration appears effortless and is oblivious to surroundings. 1. Lack of Worry about Losing Control that, Paradoxically, Results in a Sense of Control Lack of worry allows people to maintain concentration and focus on task.
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Cont. 4. A Loss of Self-Consciousness. The ego - is quieted. We do not have to think before we act. “In flow the self is fully functioning, but not aware of itself doing it. .. 5. Time No Longer Seems to Pass in Ordinary Ways. Time may seem to pass more quickly than usual, or it may appear to be vastly slowed down. 1. Autotelic Nature of the Experience Means that the experience is don for its own sake rather than a means to another goal.
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Flow Accompanies a Challenging Activity that Requires Skill 1. It is only when the demands of the situation present a challenge to the person’s skills that flow is possible. 2.
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course HUM SRVS 100 taught by Professor Lovern/elam during the Fall '07 term at Allan Hancock College.

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Pos._Psych._Ch._4_ppt - Leisure, Optimal Experience, and...

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