Pos._Psych._Ch._5_ppt - Love and Well-Being The Psychology...

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Love and Well-Being The Psychology of Love Evolution and Love From an evolutionary perspective, love has properties that help us adapt. Marriage and Well-Being Married people are consistently happier and healthier than single people. Marital quality is a significant predictor of subjective well-being.
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Cont. Marriages with more positive interactions, emotional expressiveness, and greater role sharing are associated with greater life satisfaction. On the negative side, problems with interpersonal relationships, particularly intimate relationships, are among the most frequently reported triggers for depression. The effect of marriage on well-being is stronger for men. Single men are less happy than single women, married men are as happy or happier than married women.
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Cont. Marriage also appears to have positive benefits for physiological health. Couples who interact in positive way have lower blood pressure. Married men have fewer infectious diseases and live longer. Men seem to benefit simply from being married, whereas women need a good marriage in order to show increased health benefits. Strength of marriage in US declined since 1970’s. Married women less happy but single men seem to be getting more happy.
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The Varieties of Love A Two-Factor Theory of Love Passionate Love – is the intense longing for the beloved. It can take the form of the terrible despair of rejection or the joy of emotional union and sexual fulfillment. Companionate Love – is a quieter form of love that is associated with affection, companionship, friendship, and long term commitment to relationships.
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Multifactor Theories of Love The Love Styles Six Styles of Love First is Eros – it is passionate love or the experience of love that draws one to someone with an almost irresistible pull and a desire to be the exclusive focus of that person’s attention. Second is Ludus – described as “game playing” love. Relationships are seen as a way to play with experiencing feelings of affection and attraction.
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Cont. Third is Storge - love that is primarily affectionate and close but not always exciting. Fourth is Pragma – a very practical and pragmatic approach to love. One seeks a person who fulfills certain conditions or who has certain rational and objective qualities that are necessary for a suitable partner. Fifth is Mania – both involve passionate emotionalism and an almost obsessive focus on one’s lover, however, the experience of love always seems to be painful.
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Sixth is Agape – is a selfless love. It is a style of love that asks nothing from the lover and is oriented toward giving, not getting. The lover who exhibits this style is not so
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course HUM SRVS 100 taught by Professor Lovern/elam during the Fall '07 term at Allan Hancock College.

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Pos._Psych._Ch._5_ppt - Love and Well-Being The Psychology...

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