Pos._Psych._Ch._9 - INTERVENTIONS FOR ENHANCED WELL-BEING...

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INTERVENTIONS FOR ENHANCED WELL-BEING THE DISEASE MODEL OF MENTAL ILLNESS AND ITS PROBLEMS No standard method for assessing Positive Psychology functioning is in use today. The standard manual used for diagnostic assessment of mental illness is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-IV)
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Disease Model – any mental illness that is a distinct deviation from normality that can be identified by a unique cluster of symptoms that are caused by a specific pathogen. Psychological problems are generally based on normal human emotional experiences that are either unnecessarily over – or under controlled. One of the most unfortunate consequences of the disease model has been the creation of a victim mentality in the health professions and in clients or patients.
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Cont. If health professionals & psychotherapists treat patients as helpless pawns or victims then two things can happen: One, the professionals begin to react to the patients as if they are helpless and need to be fixed. They take on the total responsibility for treatment. Two, the self-fulfilling prophecy begins to operate, and the patients see themselves as helpless and passively allow themselves to be poked, probed, and pilled. They relinquish any responsibility for their own treatment.
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Cont. As this victimology has continued, each new edition of the DSM has included more and more new types of mental “illness”.
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TOWARD A CLASSIFICATION OF STRENGTHS One of the tasks of Positive Psychology is to develop a classification system of human strengths.
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THE DIMENSIONS OF POSITIVE MENTAL HEALTH Marie Jahoda and Positive Mental Health Jahoda began her analysis with a listing of three unacceptable criteria for positive mental health: the absence of mental illness conformity to social norms Permanent states of being Mental health must be defined by how one adapts to inevitable changes
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Cont. Jahoda’s six criteria for positive mental health: Attitudes toward the self Growth , development and self-actualization An integrated personality Autonomy Perception of reality Environmental mastery In general Johada presents a picture of a person who is able to balance a number of personality factors. Because of this balance, the person can form healthy relationships with others and has the capacity to reach desired goals in life.
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Carol Ruff and Psychological Well-Being Six criteria for psychological well-being: Self-acceptance Personal growth Positive relations with other people Autonomy Purpose in life Environmental mastery The ways in which people find a sense of psychological well-being vary at different points in the life span. (Young – activities; middle-aged – positive
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course HUM SRVS 100 taught by Professor Lovern/elam during the Fall '07 term at Allan Hancock College.

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Pos._Psych._Ch._9 - INTERVENTIONS FOR ENHANCED WELL-BEING...

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