Pos._Psych._Ch._8_ppt. - POSITIVE MENTAL HEALTH: THRIVING...

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POSITIVE MENTAL HEALTH: THRIVING AND FLOURISHING POSITIVE DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN Psychologist have long been concerned with how people grow and develop over the course of a lifetime. Newer theories believe that in addition to reacting to events, people can also anticipate upcoming changes and prepare for them before life challenges turn into crises.
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Cont. Therefore, adult development is a continuous process of anticipating the future, appraising and reappraising goals, adjusting to current realities, and regulating expectations so as to maintain a sense of well-being in the face of changing circumstances.
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Resilience: Healthy Adjustment  to Difficult Childhood Poor early environments do not necessarily result in psychological problems for the children as adults in fact quite the opposite often happens. However, early family environments are extremely important even though some children learn how to adjust to difficult environments and are less affected than other children.
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Cont. Resilience is defined as a “pattern of positive adaptation in the face of significant adversity or risk”. Werner (1995) described a core group of characteristics typical of resilient children: First, they were able to find a nurturing surrogate parent. The ability to emotionally detach from a disturbed parent was only the first step. Second, the children had good social and communication skills and at least one close friend. Also had desire to help & nurture others
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Cont. Third, the children had creative outlets, activities, or hobbies that they could focus on when life became even more difficult. Competence with this activity gave them a sense of pride and mastery. Fourth, these children seemed to believe that life would somehow work out well. They were optimistic, seemed to have an internal locus of control, and a positive self-concept. They also developed a style of coping that combined autonomy with the ability to ask for help when necessary.
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Cont. Last, their families held religious beliefs that provided meaning in difficult times. Family factors were different for boys and girls. For boys: the important factors were: a male role model and encouragement of emotional expressiveness
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Cont. Girls needed homes that emphasized: Risk taking and independence and Also provided reliable support from an older female A particularly positive influence on girls was a mother who was steadily employed. Werner notes that these “protective buffers” could be found in resilient children regardless of differences in ethnicity, social class, and geographic location. Resilient children seek out what they need and
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course HUM SRVS 10 taught by Professor Lovern/elam during the Fall '07 term at Allan Hancock College.

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Pos._Psych._Ch._8_ppt. - POSITIVE MENTAL HEALTH: THRIVING...

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