Fattyacids

Fattyacids - Fatty Acids Fatty Acids are carboxylic acids with long-chain hydrocarbon tails They are not frequently free in nature and are mostly

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1 Fatty Acids • Fatty Acids are carboxylic acids with long-chain hydrocarbon tails – They are not frequently free in nature, and are mostly found as esters in other lipids – The most predominant fatty acids in plants and animals are palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and stearic acids (C 16 and C 18 ) – Over half of the fatty acids in plants and animals are unsaturated (contain double bonds), often polyunsaturated Fats are solid at room temp. Oils are liquid at room temp. Physical Properties of Saturated Fatty Acids Saturated fatty acids are highly flexible molecules that can assume a wide range of conformations – there is relatively free rotation about each C—C bond – the extended conformation is still the lowest energy because it minimizes unfavorable steric interactions The melting points of saturated fatty acids increases regularly with the number of carbons – i.e. longer saturated fatty acids remain solid at increasingly higher temperatures as chain length increases
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This note was uploaded on 07/02/2011 for the course CHEM R340 taught by Professor Tolbert during the Summer '11 term at Indiana.

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Fattyacids - Fatty Acids Fatty Acids are carboxylic acids with long-chain hydrocarbon tails They are not frequently free in nature and are mostly

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