FinalReview-Spr04 - Final Course Review COP 3330...

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Final Course Review COP 3330: Introduction to OO Programming © Dr. David A. Workman School of CS April 14, 2004
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Spring 2004 (c) Dr. David A. Workman 2 Course Objectives 1. Introduce Software Engineering Concepts and Notation Software Development Process Universal Modeling Language (UML) 2. Introduce Object-Oriented Software Design Concepts Software Design Concepts and Styles Object-Oriented Design Concepts and Methods 3. Introduce the Java Programming Language Basics of Java and relationship to the C language. Features of Java for implementing OO designs. Features of Java for Graphical User Interface development.
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Spring 2004 (c) Dr. David A. Workman 3 Concepts and Terminology Software Engineering Computer Science Software Process (and Process Models) Use Case Model ( User’s View of the System (external view) and what it is capable of doing) Analysis Model ( Developer’s View of the System (internal model) Architecture) Design Model (Developer’s View of the System (internal model) Detailed Design) Deployment Model ( Operational View of the System and its Distribution Topology) Test Model ( Plan for how system will be tested ) Software Development Cycle 1. Requirements Definition and Capture (Requirements Elicitation) 2. Requirements Analysis and Specification (Requirements Elaboration) 3. Software Design 4. Coding and Unit Testing 5. Integration and System Testing
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Spring 2004 (c) Dr. David A. Workman 4 Concepts and Terminology Design Process (Focus Areas) Data structure ( problem Inputs, Outputs and their relationships ) System architecture (modularity and organization)(allocation of functionality to modules) Interfaces and their representation (module connectivity, protocol, and data flow) Components and their detail (internal component data and algorithms)
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Spring 2004 (c) Dr. David A. Workman 5 Design Focus Areas Data Design An enumeration of all relevant information (data) elements that must be handled by the system together with specifying the relationships that must be defined, created and maintained among these elements. Examples: composition, aggregation, association, specialization, generalization, and multiplicity are relationships used in object- oriented design methods. Architectural Design An enumeration of all the relevant modules (logical organizational units) and components (processing units), their functionality and data processing responsibilities, their inter-dependencies, connectivity and/ or communication relationships with other architectural units.
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Spring 2004 (c) Dr. David A. Workman 6 Design Focus Areas Interface Design An interface is defined when two or more architectural units must exchange data with each other or interact in some way. An interface design must specify the data content exchanged, the direction of flow , timing constraints, interaction protocols , and mechanism for communication (e.g., hardware signal, hardware registers, shared variables, data file, database record or relation, gui).
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