Megan James Essay 3 Comparison

Megan James Essay 3 Comparison - Save a L ife with Donation...

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Unformatted text preview: Save a L ife with Donation By Megan James Inst ructor Yanira Monreal ENG 101 Section 61387 18 April 2011 Megan James I nst ructor Yanira Monreal ENG 101 Section 61387 18 April 2011 Save a L ife with Donation Currently there are approximately 110,000 Americans waiting for an organ t ransplant, with 81,000 of them wait ing for vital organs. Recent polls show that only 37 percent of Americans are very likely to donate their organs after death and 25 percent said they are not likely at all to donate after death. Nevertheless, with the ever growing demand for organ donors, many have suggested alternative options for those living and for those who passed. Doctors and organizations both have suggested these alternatives to help advance the amount of available organs, whereas, some believe these alternatives could be against ones code of ethics. First, with so many people waiting for t ransplants, offering incentives to organ donors could benefit those waiting for organs by increasing the amount of willing donors. Addit ional the donors themselves would also benefit because they could receive a payment after death to help their families recoup the costs of such things like funerals and burials and any other costs associated with their passing. The American Medical Association is in favor of pilot studies of the effects of f inancial incentive for people who donate organs after death (Mantel 343). Fur thermore, when considering cost, once someone receives an organ t ransplant they also are taken off dialysis, which in tu rn save the Department of Health and Human Services quite a bit of money. On the other hand, offering financial incentives raises many concerns among people. Dolph Chianchiano, of the National K idney Foundation in New York states, Our primary objection is that any k ind of financial incentives has the potential of exploiting members of lower socioeconomic classes (343). Mantel (2011, pg. 343) says, after Congress passed the National Organ T ransplant Act of 1984, someone who donated an organ was no able to be considered for valuable consideration. G reat info provided! Secondly, an alternative to t ry to increase available donors is Presumed Consent. Presently a presumed consent law states, Anyone is a potential organ donor, unless he or she has declared an opposite wish (Berger 718). Several European count ries that have adopted presumed consent laws show a large increase in available organs. Aust ria alone has seen donor organs increase four t imes over. Implementing a presumed consent law also grants the ability to extend the lives of people who might have dies without getting a t ransplant. The Council on Ethics states, If 69 percent of the population would be willing to donate their own organs, then...
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This note was uploaded on 07/07/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '11 term at Rio Salado.

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Megan James Essay 3 Comparison - Save a L ife with Donation...

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