4. Earths Energy Budget

4. Earths Energy Budget - Earth's Energy Budget Earth has 2...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Earth’s Energy Budget Earth has 2 heat engines: Internal External Internal Heat Engine Energy that drives plate tectonics Sourced by radioactivity 1/1000 th the energy provided by the sun
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Earth’s Energy Budget External Heat Engine Energy provided by the sun Drives the climate system Maintains Earth’s average global surface temperature 15°C (59°F)
Background image of page 2
Earth’s Energy Budget Balance between Incoming solar radiation (electromagnetic radiation) mostly short wave Outgoing terrestrial radiation mostly long wave
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Electromagnetic Radiation Form of the energy the earth receives from the sun Behaves as waves and as particles
Background image of page 4
Electromagnetic Radiation Waves Self propagating electric and magnetic waves Wavelength ( λ ) = crest to crest distance (m) Frequency ( ν ) = number of wave crests to pass a certain point in 1 sec (per sec) λ
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Electromagnetic Radiation Particles Stream of photons » Packets of energy » Pulses of electromagnetic radiation » Smallest amount of energy that can be transmitted by a electromagnetic wave
Background image of page 6
Energy of a Photon E = h ν or hc/ λ Where: E= energy of a photon ν = frequency (1/sec) h = Planck’s constant (6.63 X 10 -34 kgm 2 /sec) c = speed λ = wavelength Thus short wave radiation long wave radiation = high energy photons = lower energy = high frequency = lower frequency
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Electromagnetic Spectrum See KKC 3-3 (color plates) Sun Earth
Background image of page 8
Electromagnetic Radiation Range of wavelengths emitted by any body Function of its surface temperature Hotter bodies Higher energy photons Shorter wavelength
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Electromagnetic Radiation Sun emits visible radiation ~6000K Earth emits infrared (IR) radiation (15°C + 273) = 288K (K(Kelvin) = °C + 273)
Background image of page 10
Black Body Radiation Black Body Radiator Emits radiation with 100% efficiency at all wavelengths Total energy emitted is a function of its temperature Distribution of wavelengths is a function of its absolute temperature (described by Planck’s Law) Sun ~ perfect black body Earth- not perfect
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Black Body Radiation Peak wavelength emitted by a black body (Wein’s Law) λ peak (in microns) = 2877/T(K) For Sun 5780K = temperature of photosphere λ peak Sun = 2877/5780 = 497 nm = .497 x 10 m
Background image of page 12
Electromagnetic Spectrum See KKC 3-3 (color plates) Sun Earth
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Solar Radiation Fig. 1.2- Bigg
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/08/2011 for the course GLY 3074 taught by Professor Ellenmartin during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

Page1 / 56

4. Earths Energy Budget - Earth's Energy Budget Earth has 2...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online