pharma2020final

pharma2020final - Pharmaceuticals Pharma 2020: The vision...

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Pharma 2020: The vision # Pharma 2020: The vision Which path will you take?* Pharmaceuticals *connectedthinking pwc
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Table of contents Introduction 1 A growth market 2 Emerging opportunities 3 Compound crisis 5 External barriers to innovation 8 Mixed signals 9 The bill for every ill 10 Washington blues 12 Blurring healthcare boundaries 14 Pay-for-performance 16 Medicines for different markets 18 Healthy habits and fab jabs 19 Sticking to the rules 21 What’s in a name? 24 The need for a dynamic new approach 27 Access to basic research 28 Pharmaceutical research 29 Pharmaceutical development 31 Regulation 33 The supply chain 36 Sales and marketing 38 Conclusion 40 Acknowledgements 42 References 43
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Introduction Demand for effective medicines is rising, as the population ages, new medical needs emerge and the disease burden of the developing world increasingly resembles that of the developed world. The E7 countries – Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Russia and Turkey – are also becoming much more prosperous, with real gross domestic product (GDP) projected to triple over the next 13 years. By 2020, the E7 could account for as much as one-fifth of global sales. Yet the biopharmaceutical sector (Pharma) will find it hard to capitalise on these opportunities unless it can change the way in which it functions. Its core problem is lack of productivity in the lab. Several external factors have arguably exacerbated the industry’s difficulties, but the inescapable truth is that it now spends far more on research and development (R&D) and produces far fewer new molecules than it did 20 years ago. The shortage of good medicines in the pipeline underlies many of the other challenges Pharma faces, including its increasing expenditure on sales and marketing, deteriorating financial performance and damaged reputation. At the start of the decade, many people thought that science would come to the industry’s rescue and that molecular genetics would reveal numerous new biological targets, but the human genome has proved even more complex than anyone first envisaged. It is no longer the speed at which scientific knowledge is advancing so much as it is the healthcare agenda that is dictating how Pharma evolves. The first part of our report highlights a number of issues that will have a major bearing on the industry over the next 13 years. The second part covers the changes we believe will best help pharmaceutical companies: operate in this new milieu realise the potential the future holds; and enhance the value they provide shareholders and society alike. Pharma 2020: The vision 1
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A growth market Demographic, epidemiological and economic shifts are transforming the pharmaceuticals market. The population is growing and aging; new areas of medical need are emerging; and the diseases from which people in developing countries suffer are increasingly like those that trouble people living in the developed world. These changes will generate some huge opportunities for Pharma.
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This note was uploaded on 07/08/2011 for the course BM 501 taught by Professor Kop during the Spring '11 term at Bloomsburg.

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pharma2020final - Pharmaceuticals Pharma 2020: The vision...

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