Brown v - Brown v. Board of Education From Wikipedia, the...

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Unformatted text preview: Brown v. Board of Education From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation , search Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Supreme Court of the United States Argued December 9, 1952 Reargued December 8, 1953 Decided May 17, 1954 Full case name Oliver Brown et al. v. Board of Education of Topeka et al. Citations 347 U.S. 483 ( more ) 74 S. Ct. 686; 98 L. Ed. 873; 1954 U.S. LEXIS 2094; 53 Ohio Op. 326; 38 A.L.R.2d 1180 Prior history Judgment for defendants, 98 F. Supp. 797 ( D. Kan. 1951) Subsequent history Judgment on relief, 349 U.S. 294 (1955) ( Brown II ); on remand, 139 F. Supp. 468 (D. Kan. 1955); motion to intervene granted, 84 F.R.D. 383 (D. Kan. 1979); judgment for defendants, 671 F. Supp. 1290 (D. Kan. 1987); reversed, 892 F.2d 851 (10th Cir. 1989); vacated, 503 U.S. 978 (1992) ( Brown III ); judgment reinstated, 978 F.2d 585 (10th Cir. 1992); judgment for defendants, 56 F. Supp. 2d 1212 (D. Kan. 1999) Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment , because separate facilities are inherently unequal. District Court of Kansas reversed. Court membership Chief Justice Earl Warren Associate Justices Hugo Black Stanley F. Reed Felix Frankfurter William O. Douglas Robert H. Jackson Harold H. Burton Tom C. Clark Sherman Minton Case opinions Majority Warren, joined by Unanimous Laws applied United States Constitution, Amendment XIV This box: view talk Educational separation in the US prior to Brown Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka , 347 U.S. 483 (1954), [1] was a landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court , which overturned earlier rulings going back to Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896, by declaring that state laws that established separate public schools for black and white students denied black children equal educational opportunities. Handed down on May 17 , 1954 , the Warren Court's unanimous (9-0) decision stated that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." As a result, de jure racial segregation was ruled a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution . This victory paved the way for integration and the civil rights movement . [2] Contents [ hide ] 1 Background 2 Brown v. Board of Education o 2.1 Supreme Court review o 2.2 Local outcomes 3 Social implications o 3.1 Backlash and scientific racism 4 Legal criticism and praise 5 Brown II 6 Brown III 7 Related cases 8 Common misconceptions 9 Notes 10 References 11 External links Background For much of the ninety years preceding the Brown case, race relations in the U.S. had been dominated by racial segregation . This policy had been endorsed in 1896 by the United States Supreme Court case of Plessy v. Ferguson , which held that as long as the separate facilities for the separate races were "equal," segregation did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment ("no State shall... deny to any person... the equal protection of the laws.")State shall....
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This note was uploaded on 06/28/2011 for the course POLI 1002 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at Kennesaw.

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Brown v - Brown v. Board of Education From Wikipedia, the...

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