The Effect of the Catholic Religion on Psychological Guilt

The Effect of the Catholic Religion on Psychological Guilt...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Running Head: CATHOLICISM’S EFFECT ON GUILT 1 The Effect of the Catholic Religion on Psychological Guilt Emma Torpy University of Georgia Abstract
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Catholicism, known for its punitive outlook on sin, has shown a correlation with disorders of guilt and anxiety. Catholicism has an emphasis on remorse and self-chastising which can result in distorted feelings in guilt. It is hypothesized that individuals who report a high involvement in the Catholic religion will be more likely than other denominations to have psychological disorders that are associated with feelings of guilt and remorse. In a correlational study, we will discover the connection between Catholicism and guilt-related disorders will be examined. Participants, chosen from those already diagnosed with anxiety or depression, will be asked to fill out a survey regarding their religious influence and their attitudes of guilt. Keywords: Catholic guilt, religion, anxiety, depression, guilt The accepted norm for religious influence on psychological development is that the ethical ideals and values from religion add to and shape the individual’s perception of their guilt
Background image of page 2
CATHOLICISM’S EFFECT ON GUILT 3 (Quiles & Bigbee, 1983). Quiles and Bybee define guilt as “powerful, urgent and intensely unpleasant emotion that may arise from real or imagined transgressions, substandard behavior or situations that cause another person to feel distress” (Quiles 104). Some religions result in more guilt than others due to factors such as their moral code, values and ideals. There is especially an emphasis on sin and the resulting guilt especially in the Judeo-Christian religious sects (Luyten, Corveleyn & Fontaine, 1998). In particular, Roman Catholics are considered to be a very “extrapunitive” people—meaning that they often are more shameful of themselves and place more blame and punishment on their own actions. This self-chastising complex is due to the emphasis in the Catholic Church on remorse for, confession of, and atonement for sins. This stress results in the phenomenon of Catholic guilt, also known as powerful superego guilt. This type of guilt is chronic guilt which does not have a specific origin but rather is an ongoing state (Quiles & Bybee 1983). Maltby (2005) calls this trait guilt as it is enveloped in most of the person’s thoughts and feelings. It differs from predispositional guilt in that it is not in reaction to a specific event or circumstance (Quiles & Bybee 1983). The chronic, Catholic guilt stems from the individual’s desire to meet an ideal, such as a value or practice instituted in the individual’s life by the Church, and the resulting shame at his or her shortcomings, whether they be real or perceived (Maltby, 2005).
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/23/2011 for the course PSYC 1005H taught by Professor Bernstein during the Fall '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

Page1 / 12

The Effect of the Catholic Religion on Psychological Guilt...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online