Global Pressure and Wind Systems

Global Pressure and Wind Systems - Canadian and Siberian...

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Global Pressure and Wind Systems A Model of Global Pressure – Latitudinal patterns of surface atmospheric pressure Equator low (trough) – has the greatest annual heating Subtropical High -30oN and S – related to sinking of convectional cells by the equatorial low. Subpolar low (L) – opposing winds collide causing air to rise Polar high (H) – cold dense air sinks creating High pressure This idealized pressure pattern is affected by landmasses and topography Seasonal Variations in the Pressure pattern Pressure belts shift northward in July and southward in January, following the migration of the sun’s direct rays between the TOC’s
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January Shift southward in due to location of sun’s direct rays. Icelandic Low & Aleutian low I Result from the clash of winds flowing out of a polar high R Associated with cloudy, unstable weather, winter storms
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Unformatted text preview: Canadian and Siberian highs associated with clear calm, cold, stable weather. Seasonal Variations in the Pressure Pattern July Shift northward due to location of suns direct rays. High pressure over North Pole weakens due to 24 hour daylight heating in that region. Aleutian and Icelandic lows weaken and shift poleward. North America and Eurasia develop low pressure to the south in the summer (heating) Bermuda/Azores High Pacific High affects climates of the west coast Semipermanent pressure sytems. Vary in size, intensity, and locational shifting with the seasons and suns migration. The equatorial low moves north in July, following the suns seasonal migration. The subtropical highs of the Southern Hemisphere are equatorward of their January (summer) locaitons....
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This note was uploaded on 06/26/2011 for the course GEOGRAPHY 600-201010 taught by Professor Christopherpost during the Spring '10 term at Kent State.

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Global Pressure and Wind Systems - Canadian and Siberian...

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