Theory paper - Oppression/Discrimination Anomie Social Disorganization Cultural Transmission 1 Differential Association/Social Learning Substance

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Oppression/Discrimination Anomie Social Disorganization Cultural Transmission Differential Association/Social Learning Substance Abuse Crime Culture Conflict Crime Crime Native Americans and Crime: An Integrated Perspective Alicia Deal CJ 737 12-01-05 1 1
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Native Americans and Crime: An Integrated Perspective Chapter 1 When the white man first seen us, when they first said, “Well there's something wrong with these people here. They don't have no religion. They have no judicial system. We have to do something for these people.” I guess that must have been what they thought because they totally screwed up what we already had. They introduced new religion and there was nothing wrong with our old religion. They just didn't understand it. We had our own ways of teaching our children, like the Elders and everything. There was nothing wrong with that way of teaching. They just didn't understand it. The same thing with our judicial system. We had that judicial system and the white people, when they come here, they didn't see that. They said, “These guys have nothing. We have to introduce all these different things to them so they can be one of us.” That's exactly the problem that we have. 1 Individuals of Native American ancestry account for approximately 4.1 million, or 1.5percent of the total U.S. population (2000 Census Bureau). 2 Full-blooded American Indians only account for 0.9percent (approximately 2.5 million) of the total population. Theoretically, the Native American presence should also account for this same amount or less in the criminal 1 Spoken by Chief Philip Michel Brochet, first quoted by Hamilton and Sinclair (1991) and then by Marianne Nielsen (1996:10) in Native Americans, Crime, and Justice . 2 Aboriginals, Native Americans, American Indians, and Native peoples are all terms used to describe this particular population of individuals; therefore, these terms will be used interchangeably.
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justice system. However, Native Americans are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. Criminal and victimization rates are also exceedingly high among Native Americans as compared with other racial populations. For example, Native Americans accounted for 1percent of all arrests for violent crimes in 2001 (Perry, 2004). Arrests for alcohol-related offenses were twice the national rate. The national rate was 623 arrests per 100,000 residents, while the American Indian rate was 1,240 arrests per 100,000 Native American residents. The violent victimization rate, according to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), among Native Americans was 119 victims per 1,000 individuals 12 years of age or older between the years of 1993-1998 (Rennison, 2001). This rate was two times greater than that reported by African-Americans, two and a half times greater than that of Whites, and four and a half times that experienced by Asians. Rates of victimization that report that most (57%) of the violent offenses committed against Native Americans were by Whites and nine percent by
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This note was uploaded on 06/30/2011 for the course CJ 737 taught by Professor Tittertington during the Fall '05 term at Sam Houston State University.

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Theory paper - Oppression/Discrimination Anomie Social Disorganization Cultural Transmission 1 Differential Association/Social Learning Substance

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