NMR Spectroscopy - NMR Spectroscopy From IR spectroscopy we...

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NMR Spectroscopy From IR spectroscopy we can determine which functional groups are present in a molecule In order to determine structure, we need to use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy The underlying principle in NMR is that some nuclei have a net spin Just like electrons can have a +1/2 or -1/2 spin, so can protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom The most common observed nuclei are 1 H and 13 C
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Fundamentals The compound to be studied is dissolved in a solvent, normally CDCl 3 and placed in a sample tube The tube is inserted into the probe which is in the presence of a powerful magnet The magnetic field of the instrument can vary from 60 MHz (1.41 Tesla) up to 900 MHz (21.1 Tesla) The magnet on the instrument we will use has a strength of 300 MHz or 7 Tesla
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Spin Flip The nuclei in the sample can be randomly arranged Once the sample is placed in the magnetic field most of the nuclei align their spins to be parallel (lower energy,
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This note was uploaded on 06/28/2011 for the course CH 236 taught by Professor Nikles during the Fall '09 term at University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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NMR Spectroscopy - NMR Spectroscopy From IR spectroscopy we...

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