Darkness at Noon Review

Darkness at Noon Review - Roshni Sheth HY 265 February 17,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Roshni Sheth HY 265 February 17, 2010 Darkness at Noon Review Arthur Koestler’s Darkness at Noon follows N.S. Rubashov’s experiences in a late 1930s Soviet prison, serving there for political dissidence. Ironically, Rubashov’s membership in the party begins at pre-revolutionary times, as he is one of the instigators of the revolution in 1917. After Stalin, or the No. 1, comes to power, members of the party who originally expedited the revolutionary movement are often written off as “enemies of the people,” and jailed, and even executed. As the novel progresses, the reader is introduced to every facet of Rubashov’s thought processes through flashbacks and interior monologues. The novel begins with Rubashov’s first days in prison, and he thinks back to his arrest and his previous experiences in jail during the Spanish Civil War. The person in the cell next to Rubashov is also a political dissident, but he disfavors the revolution all together and holds all allegiances to the monarchy. He and Rubashov
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Darkness at Noon Review - Roshni Sheth HY 265 February 17,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online