Miranda Warning - Roshni Sheth Miranda Warning History:...

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Roshni Sheth Miranda Warning History: “In 1963, Ernesto Miranda was accused of kidnapping and raping an 18-year-old, mildly retarded woman. He was brought in for questioning, and confessed to the crime. He was not told that he did not have to speak or that he could have a lawyer present. At trial, Miranda's lawyer tried to get the confession thrown out, but the motion was denied. In 1966, the case came in front of the Supreme Court. The Court ruled that the statements made to the police could not be used as evidence, since Miranda had not been advised of his rights.” Miranda was re-tried and convicted, but the original confession was not used as evidence. Warning: Minimal Statement: “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney, and to have an attorney present during any questioning. If you cannot afford a lawyer, one will be provided for you at government expense.” Warning as set by U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Miranda vs. Arizona : You have the right to remain silent; Anything you say can be used against you in a court of law; You have the right to consult with a lawyer and have that lawyer present during the
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This note was uploaded on 06/28/2011 for the course SPA 314 taught by Professor Belitafaki during the Spring '11 term at University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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Miranda Warning - Roshni Sheth Miranda Warning History:...

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