Genetic Drift and the Remarkable Mice

Genetic Drift and the Remarkable Mice - Genetic Drift and...

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Genetic Drift and the Remarkable Mice of St. Kitts and Nevis There was a study done once on a rodent population from the sister islands of St. Kitts and Nevis in the Caribbean. The study was done because the population of rodents on the island of St. Kitts had been decimated by the growing population of humans due to the industrializations destroying the native rodents’ habitat. For this reason, rodents from St. Kitts’ sister island called Nevis were to be introduced to the native population of rodents on the island of St. Kitts as an attempt to recover the native population to its original capacity to avoid the extinction of the animal. As the study was commenced dire problems struck immediately. The two rodent populations had previously looked identical, and they were once thought to be the same rodent. This theory was proved wrong quite quickly once the rats were found to have many failed mating attempts. Many years ago the island of St. Kitts was just a small unindustrialized island in the
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This note was uploaded on 06/29/2011 for the course BY-LAB 123L taught by Professor Cusic/whitehead during the Spring '10 term at University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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Genetic Drift and the Remarkable Mice - Genetic Drift and...

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