9-29_1_PM_HepatitisB

9-29_1_PM_HepatitisB - Hepatitis B virus CDC website...

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Hepatitis B virus CDC website: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/hepatitis/slideset/hep_b/slide_1.htm
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Key Features of Hepatitis B Virus Relevance 250 million people infected worldwide. In areas of Africa and East Asia, 50% of the population may be seropositive, 5-15% may be chronically infected (carriers). Carriers are 200x more likely than non-carriers to develop primary hepatocellular carcinoma. 300,000 cases per year in the US; 4,000 fatalities. 70-90% of maternal-neonatal infections result in chronic infection .
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Key Features of Hepatitis B Virus Enveloped virion containing partial double-stranded circular DNA genome Replication occurs through an RNA intermediate Virus encodes and carries a reverse transcriptase Virus encoded several antigenically and clinically predictive important proteins
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Key Features of Hepatitis B Virus Virus has a strict tissue tropism to the liver Virus infected cells produce and release large amounts of HBsAg particles lacking DNA Viral DNA can integrate into the host chromosome
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Hepatitis B Virion, Dane particle and HBsAG From Murray et. al., Medical Microbiology 5 th edition, 2005, Chapter 66, published by Mosby Philadelphia,,
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Nomenclature for Hepatitis B Virus components
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Transcription of Hepatitis B virus From Engleberg, et. al., Schaechter’s Mechanisms of Microbial Disease, Fourth Edition, Chapter 43, published by Lippincott Figure 43-1
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The growth cycle of Hepatitis B virus From Murray et. al., Medical Microbiology 5 th edition, 2005, Chapter 66, published by Mosby Philadelphia,, Figure 66-5
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Reverse transcription of Hepadnavirus occurs with packaging of pre-genomic RNA FIGURE 43-3 Hepatitis B virus genome replication. 1. Reverse transcription begins with the polymerase binding to a unique stem-loop structure, located at the 5′ end of pregenomic RNA. 2. The polymerase (P) uses one of its own amino acids to prime synthesis and copies three or four nucleotides derived from a bulged region of the stem-loop structure (2a). The polymerase then translocates to the 3′ copy of direct repeat 1 (DR1), which includes nucleotides that are complementary to those attached to the polymerase (2b). 3. Reverse transcription is extended from that point. As the leading front of the polymerase copies RNA into DNA, its trailing portion destroys the template that has already
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9-29_1_PM_HepatitisB - Hepatitis B virus CDC website...

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