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3.3 VSM Part IV Future-state Map

3.3 VSM Part IV Future-state Map - Part IV The Future-State...

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Part IV – The Future-State Map These notes reflect the techniques found in Learning to See, Version 1.3, by Rather & Shook, LEI 2003 MGSC 485 – Business Process Management Moore School of Business University of South Carolina
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Purpose of VSM All processes linked to customer . . . By continuous processing By pull So that each process is as close as possible to producing . . Exactly what the customer wants When the customer wants it And recognizing current context . . .
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Current Context Facility that is limited by existing conditions Product design Process technology Plant location Later question is how to change Immediate question – “ What can we do with what we have?” Future-state map answers this question
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Answer is in Eight Key Questions 1. What is takt time ? 2. Build to a finished goods supermarket or directly to shipping? 3. Where continuous flow processing? 4. Where need supermarket pull systems? 5. Where schedule production ( pacemaker )? 6. How level mix? 7. Release what increment of work ? 8. What process improvements required?
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Questions come from Part III – Lean Characteristics 1. Produce to takt time 2. Develop continuous flow, or 3. Use supermarkets to control production 4. Send customer schedule to only one process 5. Distribute production of products evenly 6. Create “initial pull” by withdrawing small, consistent increments 7. Develop ability to make “every part every day”
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Available working time : 8 hours less two 10-min breaks (8 hrs x 60 x 60) – (10 min x2) = 28,800 – 1,200 = 27,600 sec / shift Takt time : Available working time = 27,600 sec/shift = 60 sec /unit . Customer demand 480 units/shift Takt time is the incentive for coordinated flow
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Lead time (a) Supermarket schedules assembly (and is inventory buffer to customer) MTS (b) Lead time Production control schedules assembly (and ships directly to customer) AT O Adapted from Learning to See by Rother & Shook, LEI, 2003
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Must be able to predict or respond Predictable Supermarket Buffer (MTS) Standard product – predictable design Forecast rate – predictable rate and container size (pull increment) Takt time – predictable capacity within increment Can make to order (ATO) Process can respond in timely fashion Handles scope of design, rate variation How far back into the process can I permit customer demand to penetrate?
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Note cycle time differences (and many decoupling buffers).
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