American_Dream - CCollins 1 Carleen Collins Dr Cassandra Pfeifer English 1020 04 June 2020 Title of Your Report Amy Tan is an American novelist whose

American_Dream - CCollins 1 Carleen Collins Dr Cassandra...

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CCollins 1 Carleen Collins Dr. Cassandra Pfeifer English 1020 04 June 2020 Title of Your Report Amy Tan is an American novelist whose works explore mother-daughter relations and the Chinese-American struggle. Tan has written numerous other novels, including The Kitchen God's Wife , The Hundred Secret Senses , The Bonesetter's Daughter , etc. Though she has won various prizes for her work, Tan has additionally experienced a lot of analysis for her scheme in protecting racial generalizations and misguided judgments just as gross slip-ups in reviewing parts of the Chinese social legacy. She also wrote a novel, Two Kinds, that stood out in the American Dream. Amy Tan discusses in her writings why her mom doesn't like her the way she is. For example, Amy told her mother that she will never be the daughter she wants her to be. She wants to see Amy become an American prodigy. Her mother wanted to create a genius, and she wanted to demolish her dream. This change of heart occurred after numerous tests her mother had given her to memorize bible passages and the world capitals. Every time Amy would get one wrong, her mother would look in disbelief. Amy wrote Two kinds to promote and convince users of the importance of a person's ideas, no matter how perfect their English is. Tan manages to ramble, about so many complex situations where she recalls her use of language changing her life. Tan is also attempting to convey the value of staying true to yourself, and going back to your origins even if the universe doesn't see everything the same way. Amy wrote this book in 1889 in the United States, but it seems as if she wrote it today. Amy Tan
CCollins 2 writes about her mother and daughter relationship in Two Kinds. The novel is told with the narrator Amy Tan as a grown woman glancing back on her childhood. Her mother was a Chinese immigrant who lost her whole family before coming to America. Tan calls herself a fan of language, not a professor of English. Therefore, it is her interpretation of English of what she calls her mother’s internal language that is at the heart of this story. Drawing the student into the story, the narrator leads the reader over a world in which readers encounter the power of a vibrant, vivid language.

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