TH10Ch02 - WORK Work is energy in transit, from one...

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1 WORK Work is energy in transit, from one thermodynamic system to another thermodynamic system, in which the sole effect of the energy transfer can be reduced to raising a weight. Work can also be understood as a force acting against a resistance through a distance. Work= Force x Distance 1J=1N x 1 m 1 ft lb = 1 lb x 1 ft = = × × = pdv W Ads A F W ft lbf m N Mechanics from ds F W
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2 Work is not a property. Work is a path function. Work depends on the path taken between the initial and final state points. Work is not an exact differential. Path B Path A B A pdv pdv
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3 HEAT Heat is energy in transit from one thermodynamic system to another thermodynamic system due to a temperature difference between the two thermodynamic systems. 1BTU= 1 lb water at 60 F raised 1 degree F. 1 kJ=4.1816 kg water at 15 C raised 1 degree C. () 4 2 8 4 2 8 - 4 1 4 2 o R ft hr Btu/ 10 .1713 K W/m 10 5.67 constant Boltzman Stephan emissivity t coefficien fer heat trans convection h ty conductivi k area A (2.57) T T σε A Q RADIATION (2.53) ) T hA(T Q CONVECTION (2.52) dx dT kA Q CONDUCTION × × = = = σ ε
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4 points. state T) (p, e between th path taken on the depend Work and Heat als. differenti exact not are Work and Heat however P and T of functions be also can work
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This note was uploaded on 07/08/2011 for the course MAE 204 taught by Professor Errington during the Summer '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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TH10Ch02 - WORK Work is energy in transit, from one...

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