Lecture1

Lecture1 - Ecohydrology: A Primer CWR5140C: Ecohydrology...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–19. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ecohydrology: A Primer CWR5140C: Ecohydrology Fall 2009
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Episode I: So, what is this class about anyway?
Background image of page 2
What is Ecohydrology ? Field that integrates the components of the hydrologic cycle with those natural cycles occurring in ecosystems Quantifies interactons/feedbacks between hydrologic and ecologic variables Our discussion today will focus on the interplay between climate, soil and vegetation Understanding of the role of ecosystems in the global water balance Climate (T, P, v, ω ) Soil ( θ , S, K, n) Vegetation (ecophysiology)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Scientific Challenges Very large number of different processes, which calls for simplifying assumptions Large degree of variability in time and space, which impose a stochastic treatment and consideration of different temporal and spatial scales of variability
Background image of page 4
The Hydrologic Cycle
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Water in the Atmosphere Rainfall: water cools off at high elevations and turns liquid - falls Evaporation: water in open bodies and on the ground turns into vapor - rises Transpiration: water transfer through vegetation
Background image of page 6
Water in the Land Runoff: also called “rainfall excess”, it is water movement through slopes to streams, lakes and the ocean Groundwater: water infiltrated through the soil and moving in the subsurface
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
From: Chow, Maidment and Mays, Applied Hydrology, McGraw Hill, 1988
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
From: Chow, Maidment and Mays, Applied Hydrology, McGraw Hill, 1988
Background image of page 10
Global Water Balance (land) Rainfall (119,000 km 3 /yr or 31 in) = Evapotranspiration (72,000 km 3 /yr or 19 in) + Runoff (44,700 km 3 /yr or 11.7 in) + Infiltration (2,200 km 3 /yr or 0.3 in) Conclusion: the world lives on a “water budget”
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Freshwater availability
Background image of page 12
How much water is there ? 97.5 percent of total water is saline Only 2.5 % is fresh water Still, that is about 35,000,000 km 3 of freshwater available The average water use in the US is 350 gal/day Current world population is about 6 billion
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Do we have a water problem ? Existing freshwater would last about 12,000 years for the current population. So, do we have a problem ? Why ?
Background image of page 14
Not the same everywhere though… Continent Area, mln.km 2 Population, mln. Water resources, km 3 /year Potential water availability, 1000m 3 /year Average Max Min Cv per 1 km 2 per capita Europe 10.46 685 2900 3410 2254 0.08 277 4.23 North America 24.3 453 7890 8917 6895 0.06 324 17.4 Africa 30.1 708 4050 5082 3073 0.10 134 5.72 Asia 43.5 3445 13510 15008 11800 0.06 311 3.92 South America 17.9 315 12030 14350 10320 0.07 672 38.2 Australia and Oceania 8.95 28.7 2404 2880 1891 0.10 269 83.7 The World 135 5633 42785 44751 39775 0.02 317 7.60 Source: SHI/UNESCO (1999), WORLD WATER RESOURCES AND THEIR USE
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Episode II: The “Ecohydrology Perspective”
Background image of page 16
An interdisciplinary approach
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Soil moisture: the key stock Useful to assess the favorableness of environmental conditions to some given vegetation species Influence on intra-species ecological relationships, e.g., survival, coexistence Indicator of water use strategies in different ecosystems
Background image of page 18
Image of page 19
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/09/2011 for the course CWR 5104C taught by Professor Miralles during the Spring '11 term at FIU.

Page1 / 141

Lecture1 - Ecohydrology: A Primer CWR5140C: Ecohydrology...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 19. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online