Chapter 12 Notes

Chapter 12 Notes - Chapter 12: Social Psychology Skip Pages...

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Chapter 12: Social Psychology Skip Pages 553-567, in chapter 13 : 602-612 I. Attitudes a. Are feelings, often based on our beliefs, that predispose us to respond in a particular way to objects, people, and events. b. Emotions involved, i.e. feeling dislike towards someone based on the belief that this neighbor always takes your parking spot. i. Shaped by social context wouldn’t curse someone out at the dinner table at Thanksgiving ii. And also shaped by direct experiences, i.e. health care reform, everyone has different opinions c. Our attitudes predict our behaviors imperfectly because other factors, including the external situation, also influence behavior d. The mere exposure fact i. The more we are exposed to something, the more likely we are to like it. ii. The more you are exposed to faces, the more you like them and the higher you will rank them II. Cognitive Dissonance a. When our attitudes and actions are opposed, we experience tension. This is called cognitive dissonance b. First proposed by Leon Festinger people feel uncomfortable when their attitudes and behaviors and not in like so you relieve the tension by making changes. c. People reduce dissonance by changing their attitudes or behaviors. d. Did something very boring and asked to lie about something and paid to do it. Then privately asked to rate the enjoyment of the tasks on the questionnaire. After which amount will your enjoyment be higher? have cognitive dissonance in $1 condition. The $20 condition still didn’t enjoy it, but the $1 condition changed their attitudes. III. Justifying Effort
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a. Hazing rituals want loyal group members, then make it hard to join the group IV. Attributing Behavior to Persons or to Situations a. Attribution Theory: Fritz Heider (1958)—we have a tendency to give causal explanations for someone’s behavior, often by crediting either the situation of
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This note was uploaded on 07/09/2011 for the course PSYC 1101 taught by Professor Crystal during the Fall '08 term at UGA.

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Chapter 12 Notes - Chapter 12: Social Psychology Skip Pages...

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