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Expt4_Assign - Experiment 4 Sorting Graphing and Predicting...

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85 Experiment 4 Sorting, Graphing, and Predicting Name: Date: Section: Partners: INTRODUCTION Expt 4 Periodic Properties ver2.wpd Sorting objects is an activity which begins so early in childhood that as adults we naturally begin to sort objects, ideas, or data when confronted with new problems. Sorting is also crucial for finding patterns in scientific work. We'll begin today's exercise by first sorting tangible objects found in plastic containers, and then move on to sorting information on the chemical elements. This type of sorting of information produced the realization that elements fell into families, and that their properties were periodic when listed by their atomic mass or number, which in turn led to the discovery of new elements. EXPERIMENTAL C Follow the procedure outlined below step by step. I. SORTING TANGIBLE OBJECTS C SORTING BOX A. Single Sorts. Obtain a sorting box, remove its contents, and sort these contents into groups, in a manner you feel most appropriate. As you proceed list each criterion used to sort the contents. For example, by size, color or texture. After at least five different sorts, star that category on your list which you think is most useful or important and leave your samples sorted by this criterion for the next step. In the lines that follow your list argue why the starred criterion is the most useful or important. Sorted by: Type Subcategories E.g . Color Red, Blue, etc. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. JUSTIFICATION FOR YOUR "BEST" SORT CATEGORY:
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86 B. Subsorts. Using your best sorting of the sorting box contents, subsort one of your already sorted groups by another criterion. For example, if you sorted by color, you might subsort one of your small color groups by shape. Use as many or as few of the blanks below as you need . E.g. Your samples Sorted by: Color (blue) into ... Sorted by: into ... Subsorts: 1. blue and round Subsorts: 1.
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