MINERALS - MINERALS Minerals are inorganic elements. Some...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MINERALS Minerals are inorganic elements. Some minerals are essential for proper metabolic function. Minerals may serve as cofactors for some enzymes or as structural elements. The essential minerals may be classified as major or trace. Vitamins are nutrients the body needs in small amounts for the function of some enzymes. They are organic compounds. Some enzymes require other small molecules to function that are not organic. These are known as minerals. As with vitamins some of these are much more likely to be in short supply than are others. The ones that are most likely to be lacking or to cause problems are the ones we will concentrate on, but we will discuss most of the known required minerals. Calcium Calcium is the mineral found in the greatest amount in the body. Comprises from 1.5 to 2.0% of the human body. 99% found in bones and teeth, 1% in blood Absorption of calcium is not efficient Requires Vitamin D for absorption Functions Calcium functions to add structure to teeth and bones. Soluble calcium functions in: Blood clotting Muscle tone and contraction Nerve transmission Some enzymatic functions The functions of soluble calcium are critically important. Without calcium muscles can not contract. A deficiency of soluble calcium would result in your heart stopping to beat. It would also mean that your blood would not clot and your nerves would not work. This cannot be allowed to happen. The mineral selected for all of these functions is stored in bones. If the level of soluble calcium starts to decrease, the body replaces it by dissolving bone. It is not good for bones to have calcium removed, but weak bones are better than death. Requirements
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Balance studies with calcium are difficult Minimum requirement estimated to be 400 to 650 mg/day RDA for adults is 800 mg/day For teens the recommendation is 1,200 mg/day to supply for bone synthesis Effects of calcium deficiency in children are: Stunting of growth Poor quality bones and teeth Malformed bones (rickets) In adults, effects are: Osteoporosis Osteomalcia Osteoporosis Word means "holes in bones" Results from loss of calcium from bone to meet body's other calcium needs. Strong genetic, age and hormonal components. Results from poor calcium absorption. Serious health problem Affects women past the age of menopause Medications aimed at slowing loss of calcium Experimental drugs that may replace lost calcium Weakened bones that result from osteoporosis are a major factor in broken bones among the elderly
Background image of page 2
Osteoporosis does NOT result from a lack of calcium in the diet in developed countries. It results from poor absorption of calcium from food when the levels of sex hormones decrease in people genetically predisposed to the condition. It is most common in those of northern European ancestry. We normally associate Osteoporosis with females. This is because females pass through menopause at a younger age than when men stop making their sex hormones. Women also live longer than men. In the past most men died before
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/22/2011 for the course FDSCTE 201 taught by Professor Magino during the Spring '11 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 16

MINERALS - MINERALS Minerals are inorganic elements. Some...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online