History-Workshop #5-Women's rights

History-Workshop #5-Women's rights - History 260 Workshop...

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History 260 Workshop #5 Due to the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s speech about the Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions refers to the Constitution of America because Elizabeth wanted equality for women and men. Up until 1848 women’s rights and suffrage had been ignored, without the help and strong-willed women of this time period, women could still be merely “house-wives”. This term of being a “house- wife” is a negative outlook on women and reflects badly against America. The Constitution declares that all men are created equal and they are given independence but they are not the only gender inhabiting the country. At birth Sarah Grimke was the daughter of a Southern plantation owner, but as she grew older she separated herself from these ideals. She defended the abolition movement but most importantly sought out equality for her gender. Ten years before the Seneca Falls Convention, Sarah Grimke published the “Letter on the Equality of the
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History-Workshop #5-Women's rights - History 260 Workshop...

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