XCOM 285 Week 8 CheckPoint Privacy Laws and Policies Debate

XCOM 285 Week 8 CheckPoint Privacy Laws and Policies Debate...

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The ‘best practices' in communication privacy policies at the workplace, as we've read, are ideally designed in order to maintain protection of a company's financial interests, as well as maintenance of privacy and control over any information deemed ‘proprietary' or particularly reserved for the use of the company and not to be shared with other individuals or corporations. Additionally communication policies are often structured so that management is protected from exposure to risks - this can be risks of legal suit, or risks of slander and libel, or risks of compromised ethics due to conflict of interest in shared information. The practices that have evolved in the 2lst century are complex and must include all types of communication from email, to phone, to printed documents, as well as video, multimedia, and hybrid types of communication such as devices that can store and share images or text on extended networks or remotely. The question of how to protect privacy of information, people, and business practices and resources, involves as well the overall issue of how ‘transparent' a company must be to its clients, its employees, and its industry sector. A hedge fund or stock trading company, for example, may have very different privacy requirements from that of a bank, a public institution such as a school, or a health-and-welfare institution such as a hospital. Privacy may be interpreted and defined differently by these various institutions, according to the degree and weighting of ‘protection' of different constituencies within and outside of the organization. A lawyer working with a client, for example, may have legal constraints and privileges over types of information shared with the client, or from client to another lawyer or to the courts. A teacher working with children in a public school, for example, may have very different types of protective concerns, including the requirement by law to let authorities know if it is suspected
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This note was uploaded on 06/26/2011 for the course XCOM/285 285 taught by Professor Providence during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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XCOM 285 Week 8 CheckPoint Privacy Laws and Policies Debate...

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