Lung Cancer - Running head: Lung Cancer 1 Lung cancer...

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Running head: Lung Cancer 1 Lung cancer Fatima Lazim Kaplan University
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Lung Cancer 2 Unit 7 Draft Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer around the world. Although there are so many causes for lung cancer including genetics causes as well as environmental and occupational predisposing causes, yet at least two-thirds of cases are due to natural and man- made substances in the environment. Environmental causes will include the toxic material that we chose to expose ourselves to and toxic material that we are exposed to against our will due to either geographical pollution or occupational exposure. Bad personal choices like cigarette smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, poor diet, lack of exercise, and excessive sunlight exposure can be considered toxic personal causes. On the other hand, certain drugs, hormones, radiation, viruses, bacteria, and chemicals that could be present in the water, food, or workplace could be considered occupational exposure (National Cancer Institute, 2011). In order to understand the non-genetic causes of lung cancer, this paper will discuss the following: Personally-induced toxic predisposing factors Non-personally induced occupational predisposing factors Last but not least, prevention of lung cancer Personally induced causes as I mentioned above include smoking on top of the list, excessive alcohol, and poor diet. According to the CDC $193 billion was spend annually for smoking health related illnesses between the years 2000-2004 (Center for Disease Control, 2011), yet there is a good news; cigarette production decreased by about 34%, exports decreased by about 34%, and consumption dropped by about 31% between 1990-2007 (Center for Disease Control, 2011). For those who still smoking; they still pose a threat to themselves and those around them (ETS; Environmental Tobacco Smokers). Tobacco smoke is a mix of 7,000 chemicals; most of them toxic (Center for Disease Control, 2010). On top of these chemicals is
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Lung Cancer 3 Benzene which is linked to leukemia (Throckmorton, 2006, p. 449). Furthermore, Benzene is not only present in tobacco smoke; it is also present in the urban air we breathe according to a study done in Asturias in Northern Spain. The study stated that “Exposure to urban air pollution has been associated with increased lung cancer risk. It is well established that urban and outdoor air contains known and suspected human carcinogens. Urban air contains benzo [a] pyrene, benzene , and 1,3-butadiene, together with carbon- based particles onto which carcinogens may be adsorbed, oxidants such as ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur and nitrogen oxides in particle form….”(Lopez-Cima, et al., 2011, pp. 10-22). In the Surgeon General report; it was explained very easily of how those toxins affect the lungs and weaken its defenses. The Surgeon General report compared spilling a drain cleaner on our skin daily which causes it to be irritated, if this continues then the skin will not have time to heal and do its job protecting the body against
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This note was uploaded on 06/26/2011 for the course PU 530 taught by Professor None during the Spring '11 term at Kaplan University.

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Lung Cancer - Running head: Lung Cancer 1 Lung cancer...

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