concentration - Solution Concentration Read 281 283. Try...

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Solution Concentration Solution Concentration Read 281 – 283. Try questions 1 – 8 (show work) Concentration = quantity of solute quantity of solution (not solvent) There are 3 basic ways to express concentration: 1) percentages, 2) very low concentrations, and 3) molar concentrations 1) % concentration can be in V/V, W/W, or W/V Like most %s, V/V and W/W need to have the same units on top and bottom. W/V is sort of in the same units; V is mostly water and water’s density is 1 g/mL or 1 kg/L 2 2 2 2
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Solution Concentration Solution Concentration 2) Expressing concentrations in parts per million (ppm) requires the unit on top to be 1,000,000 times smaller than the unit on the bottom E.g. 1 mg/kg or μ g/g Multiples of 1000 are expressed in this order μ _, m_, _, k_ (“_” is the base unit) (pg.631) Notice that any units expressed as a volume must be referring to a water solution (1L = 1kg) For parts per billion (ppb), the top unit would have to be 1,000,000,000 times smaller 3) Molar concentration is the most commonly used in chemistry. Ensure that units are
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1. Percentage concentration (V/V, W/V, W/W),
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This note was uploaded on 06/27/2011 for the course PHY 102 taught by Professor Rao during the Spring '09 term at Oakland University.

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concentration - Solution Concentration Read 281 283. Try...

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