{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lecture_16_Ploidy_2011

Lecture_16_Ploidy_2011 - Ploidy February 18th 2011 hree...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ploidy February 18 th , 2011 hree specimens of Odontophrynus: O. americanus male, 4x =44 (a tificial hybrid young, 3x=33 (b); O. cultripes female, 2x=22 (c).
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Announcements Problems Set 3 Due Today at 4:00 PM
Image of page 2
Review Pedigree analysis for humans – validate linkage properties via the Log Of oDds (LOD) score (cutoff = 3) LOD = log [p(specific linkage value)/p(indep. assortment)] LOD scores are additive Tetrads / Octads: Information on Linkage / Centromere position Parental Ditype (PD), Non-Parental Ditype (NPD), Tetratype (T) Crossing Over in Tetrads: Perkins Mapping Function RF = (0.5T + 3NPD)/total number of
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ploidy: Outline WHAT ARE POLYPLOIDS? HOW DO POLYPLOIDS ARISE? WHAT ARE ANEUPLOIDS AND HOW DO THEY ARISE? THE PUZZLE FOR TODAY: “Polyploidy is very common in plants but rarer in animals (for reasons that we will consider later).”
Image of page 4
Outline WHAT ARE POLYPLOIDS? Organisms with multiple sets of chromosomes
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chromosome number nomenclature 1 chromosome set = haploid (like yeast) 2 chromosome sets = diploid (like humans, or anything else with a “mom” and a “dad”) more than 2 chromosome sets = polyploidy (triploid, tetraploid,…) # of different chromosomes in each set = monoploid number “x” ( Human x = 23 ) n = (eg. Haploid) number in gametes, 2n=(eg. Diploid) number in zygote diploids n = x; 2n = 2x tetraploids n = 2x; 2n = 4x hexaploids n = 3x; 2n = 6x and so on ….
Image of page 6
Which one is Octoploid?
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Monoploids Aberrant 1x individuals from a normally 2x (or greater) population (yeast is not a monoploid since it is NORMALLY haploid) Typically sterile due to lack of pairing between homologs during meiosis Plants are TOTIPOTENT (single cell can divide and
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern