CS 171 Unit 1 Introduction to Computing and Engineering Problem Solving

CS 171 Unit 1 Introduction to Computing and Engineering Problem Solving

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CS 171 Unit 1 Introduction to Computing and Engineering Problem Solving Furman Haddix Assistant Professor Minnesota State University, Mankato Fall 2010
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Introduction to Computing and Engineering Problem Solving Syllabus Historical Perspective Generations of Computers Organization of Computers Computing Systems Processing a C++ Program
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Syllabus Matters Course: CS 171 Introduction to C++ Programming 2 credits – 3 p.m., T TE E225, Labs H TE E315 Instructor: Furman Haddix Office Hours: Monday: 11 – 11:50, 2 – 2:50, 4:30 – 4:50 Tuesday: 11 – 11:50, 1 – 2:50, 4:30 – 4:50 Wednesday: 11 – 11:50, 2 – 2:50, 4:30 – 4:50 Thursday: 11 – 11:50, 2 – 2:50 Office: WH 227 Phone: 389-1966 Text (required): Engineering Problem Solving with C++, 2/e, Etter/Ingber, Prentice-Hall
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Syllabus Matters Evaluation: In Class Exercises and Quizzes 20 Homework, Lab Assignments and Practicals 40 Exams 40 Term Exam 1 Term Exam 2 Final Exam (Comprehensive) 2:45 – 4:45 p.m., Wednesday, May 4, 2011, TE E225 Less: Low score (or 20 points of it) Course Objectives: Introduction to Computer Organization Introduction to Systems Analysis Introduction to C++ Programming
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Why Programming? Utilization of Computer Generated Information Limitations Weaknesses Strengths Peripheral Involvement in Application Implementation How to process? Is it getting the right answer? Why not? Computer controlled manufacturing Robotics Computer controlled presses Computer controlled assembly lines Just in time inventory control Microcontrollers under the hood Over 100
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Systems Languages Technology Time # Generations of Computers Programmer- Operator Machine Mechanical 1640-1945 0 Operator Low-level Vacuum Tube 1945-1955 1 System Executive High-level Transistor 1955-1965 2 Operating System 4 GL Integrated Circuit 1965-1980 3 O/S + Library VLSI 1980-2000 4 O/S + DLL Multicore Processing 2000-??? 5 Internet HTML, XML
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Charles Babbage, Esq. 1792-1871 English mathematician. Designed the Analytical Engine in the early 1800s. Published “Of the Analytical Engine” in 1864. Designed to process base ten numbers. Consisted of four parts: Storage unit Processing unit Input device Output device 7
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Vacuum Tube Computers ABC ( A tanasoff B erry C omputer) Developed at Iowa State University between 1939 and 1942 by John Atanasoff and Clifford Berry. Weighed 700 pounds. Executed one instruction every 15 seconds. .067 Herz Herz (Hz) is one cycle per second
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Vacuum Tube Computers ENIAC( E lectronic N umerical I ntegrator A nd C alculator) Developed by research team lead by John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert during the early 1940s.
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CS 171 Unit 1 Introduction to Computing and Engineering Problem Solving

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