HIS 120 Essay

HIS 120 Essay - During late 1700s and early 1800s, there...

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During late 1700s and early 1800s, there were two forces for slavery and against slavery. I want to discuss some forces for freedom with limitations first and then explore other forces for slavery later on. And finally, I will conclude my opinion why forces for slavery could beat the forces for against slavery. The forces for black freedom were often impersonal. Emergence of a market economy based on wage labor in the North, a revolutionary ideology encouraged African Americans to seek freedom, Christian morality, and revolutionary precepts were factors for against slavery. First of all, unlike an economy based on the production of cotton by slave labor in the South, in the post-revolutionary North, slavery was not economically fundamental. Farmers could more efficiently hire laborers during the labor-intensive seasons of planting and harvesting than they could maintain a year-round slave labor force. Also, transatlantic immigration brought to the North a lot of white laborers. As a market economy based on wage labor emerged, northern slaveholders had difficulty arguing for permanent black slavery. Next, the national Congress set an important standard in discouraging the expansion of slavery. For instance, Massachusetts, in its constitution of 1780, declared, “that all men are born free and equal; and that every subject is entitled to liberty.” Although this constitution did not specifically ban slavery, Elizabeth Freeman and other slaves in Massachusetts sued under it for their freedom. In the meantime, another slave, Quok
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HIS 120 Essay - During late 1700s and early 1800s, there...

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