01Introduction to Vectors - INTRODUCTION TO VECTORS A...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
I NTRODUCTION TO V ECTORS A scalar is a quantity that has magnitude but no direction. You can have signed scalar quantities as well. A vector is a quantity that has both magnitude and direction . Some examples of scalar quantities are length, temperature (signed), and mass. Some examples of vector quantities are force, acceleration, displacement, and velocity. To specify the velocity of a moving point in the coordinate plane, we must give both the rate at which the point moves (speed) and the direction of that motion. The velocity vector incorporates both pieces of information. The length of the vector represents its magnitude and its direction is represented by the direction of the arrow that represents the vector. A vector u is represented in boldface, but for our purposes, we will use u . There are a number of different ways to express a vector. When we describe vectors, it is usual to do so by expressing them in terms of a basis . To describe vectors in two dimensions, we use two basis vectors,
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/12/2011 for the course MATH 241 taught by Professor Kim during the Fall '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

Page1 / 3

01Introduction to Vectors - INTRODUCTION TO VECTORS A...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online