2011 Summer 102M Postlab 2

2011 Summer 102M Postlab 2 - object back. 4. Wiki question:...

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Lab 2 10:00 Thu Hoang PHY 102M MW 10-12 1. In the lab you saw that you could have the object at equilibrium with 2, 3 and 4 forces. Is it possible to have equilibrium (similar to this lab) with only one force with a non-zero magnitude? No, it is not possible. We need at least two forces to have equilibrium after removing the pin in the center. 2. Why did we do the two string experiment? That is, what did our measurements from that experiment tell us about the other two experiments? We did the two string experiment to get an idea of the tolerance of the force table. Ideally, the only way equilibrium is achieved is if the two masses are the same in the two string experiment. 3. If we could eliminate all friction in this experiment would it be easier or harder to keep the system in equilibrium? Explain briefly. If we eliminated all friction in this experiment, it would be easier to keep the system in equilibrium. No friction means there would be nothing pulling the
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Unformatted text preview: object back. 4. Wiki question: Look up route card (related to orienteering) and describe that activity in terms of vectors. How could you cheat at this activity? Sport that uses direction (from compass/map) to navigate from point to point with speed. Cheating could involve smart phones with GPS system. 5. There is a weight force associated with the brass ring. Is this a vector? If so, then what direction is it pointing? Is there a reason that we dont consider this when calculating Newtons second law for this system? No, mass is not a vector quantity, as it has no direction. 6. How many Newtons do you weigh? (Please let me know your weight in pounds too (or your mass in kg), so I can check you. Also, if you prefer not to tell me your weight, just pick a weight in pounds or mass in kg and use that ) Weight in lbs: 95 lbs Weight in kg: 43.18 kg Weight in N: 431.8 N...
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This note was uploaded on 06/28/2011 for the course PHY 302K taught by Professor Kaplunovsky during the Summer '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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