Final Project Report-Mechanical Shaker

Final Project - 1 Mechanical Shaker Output Optimization This paper received an A Comment on why was"paper could be polished Conclusion section I

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1 Mechanical Shaker Output Optimization This paper received an A-. Comment on why was “paper could be polished. Conclusion section!” I asked what could have been done to make an A, and he said better formatting and more writings on conclusions you made from all the graphs. This project was not an easy A. It took about 50 man hours. Introduction A mechanical shaker is a device that simply shakes one mass in relation to a stationary base. Between the shaking mass and the base are dampers and springs that will cause sinusoidal motion when a sinusoidal force is applied to the non-stationary mass. Typically, the sinusoidal force applied to the non-stationary mass is controlled by a rotating imbalance that is located inside of the non-stationary mass. When simplified, you can think of a mechanical shaker as a system with one degree of freedom, damping, and forced vibration. This report will examine how the mass of the moving base, the mass of the rotating imbalance, the spring constant equivalent, the damping constant equivalent, the radius of eccentricity of the rotating imbalance, and the rotational frequency of the rotating imbalance, relate to one another and to the power output, amplitude, and position equations of the mechanical shaker. The mechanical shaker’s amplitude and power outputs are optimized by adjusting the variables listed above. Our process for finding proper variable values is described along with results and conclusions from our calculations. Design approach The problem presented for evaluation requires finding input variable values that will produce an average shaker power output of 1 horsepower or more and a shaker vibration amplitude between 0.1 and 0.2 inches over all frequencies between the range of 20 and 30 hertz. The total mass of the shaker must be at least 50 times larger than the mass of the rotating imbalance. The variables we can adjust include the radius of eccentricity (e), the total mass of the shaker (M), the rotating imbalance mass (m), the spring constant (k), and the damping constant (c). It is important to note that we are only analyzing the shaker’s steady state motion. The transient response is assumed to be negligible by the time we are analyzing the shaker. Solving the Power Equation
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This note was uploaded on 06/29/2011 for the course MAE 315 taught by Professor Wu during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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Final Project - 1 Mechanical Shaker Output Optimization This paper received an A Comment on why was"paper could be polished Conclusion section I

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