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Chapter2 - Chapter 2 Problems of Illness and Health Care...

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Chapter 2 Problems of Illness and Health Care
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Chapter Outline The Global Context: Patterns of Health and Illness Around the World Sociological Theories of Illness and Health Care HIV/AIDS: A Global Health Concern The Growing Problem of Obesity Mental Illness: The Hidden Epidemic
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Health Insurance At this annual three-day free medical clinic in Virginia, rural families, most with little or no health insurance, line up for hours to receive free health care. All services and medical supplies are donated.
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Classifying Countries Three categories according to economic status: Developed countries have relatively high gross national income and have economies made up of many different industries. Developing countries have relatively low gross national income and their economies are much simpler. Least developed countries are the poorest countries of the world.
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Morbidity Illnesses, symptoms, and the impairments they produce. In less developed countries, where poverty and chronic malnutrition are widespread, infectious and parasitic diseases, such as HIV disease, tuberculosis, diarrheal diseases (caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites), measles, and malaria are much more prevalent than in developed countries, where chronic health problems such as cardiovascular disease and cancer are the major health threats
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Life Expectancy Average number of years individuals born in a given year can expect to live. Infant mortality - Number of deaths of live- born infants under 1 year of age.
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Epidemiological Transition The shift from a society characterized by low life expectancy and parasitic and infectious diseases to one characterized by high life expectancy and chronic and degenerative diseases. Epidemiologists study the social origins and distribution of health problems in a population and how patterns of health and disease vary between and within societies.
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Infant Mortality Rate The number of deaths of live-born infants under 1 year of age per 1,000 live births (in any given year).
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Life Expectancy and Under-5 Mortality Rate by Region: 2005
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Top Three Causes of Death by Age Group: United States, 2008 Age (years) First Second Third 1-4 Unintentional injuries Congenital/ chromosomal abnormalities Cancer 5-14 Unintentional injuries Cancer Congenital/ chromosomal abnormalities 15-24 Unintentional injuries Homicide Suicide
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Top Three Causes of Death by Age Group: United States, 2008 Age (years) First Second Third 25-44 Unintentional injuries Cancer Heart disease 45-64 Cancer Heart disease Stroke 65 and older Heart disease Cancer Stroke
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Childbirth Assistance and Lifetime Chance of Maternal Mortality % of Births Attended by Skilled Personnel Lifetime Chance of Dying from Maternal Mortality Developed countries 99 1 in 4,000 Developing countries 57 1 in 61 Sub-Saharan Africa 41 1 in 16
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Under-5 Mortality Rate Refers to the rate of deaths of children under age 5.
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