Chapter6 - Chapter 6 Poverty and Economic Inequality...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 6 Poverty and Economic Inequality
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter Outline The Global Context: Poverty and Economic Inequality around the World Sociological Theories of Poverty and Economic Inequality Economic Inequality and Poverty in the United States
Background image of page 2
Chapter Outline Consequences of Poverty and Economic Inequality Strategies for Action: Alleviating Poverty Understanding Poverty and Economic Inequality
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Defining and Measuring Poverty Poverty is the lack of resources necessary for material well-being: food, water, housing, land, and health care. Lack of resources that leads to hunger and physical deprivation is absolute poverty . Relative poverty refers to a deficiency in material and economic resources compared with some other population.
Background image of page 4
Poverty Washington, DC, the capitol of one of the wealthiest nations in the world, has one of the highest rates of poverty in the United States.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Human Poverty Index (HPI) Based on three measures of deprivation: 1. Deprivation of life. 2. Deprivation of knowledge. 3. Deprivation in living standards.
Background image of page 6
Measures of Human Poverty in Developing Countries Longevity Knowledge Decent Standard of Living Probability of not surviving to age 40 Adult illiteracy A composite measure based on: % of people without safe water. % of people without health services. % of children under 5 who are underweight
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Measures of Human Poverty in Industrialized Countries Longevity Knowledge Decent Standard of Living Probability of not surviving to age 60 Adult functional illiteracy rate % living below the poverty line, which is 50% of median income
Background image of page 8
Poverty Thresholds: 2006 (Householder Younger Than 65) Household Makeup Poverty Threshold One adult $11,201 Two adults $14,417 One adult, one child $14,840 Two adults, one child $17,330 Two adults, two children $21,834
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Global Poverty and Economic Inequality More than one-fourth of the world’s population live on less than $2 a day and about 1.4 billion people live on less than $1.25 a day. Every day, nearly 1 in 5 of the world’s population goes hungry. The richest 1 percent in the world own 40% of global household wealth; the richest 2% own more than half of global wealth; and the richest 10% own 85% of total global wealth.
Background image of page 10
Question The poor are poor because the American way of life doesn't give all people an equal chance. A. Strongly agree B. Agree somewhat C. Unsure D. Disagree somewhat E. Strongly disagree
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Perspective Poverty and economic inequality serve positive functions for society: Low-paid, poor workers are willing to do dirty, dangerous, difficult work others refuse to do Poverty provides work for those in “poverty industry” (e.g. welfare workers). Poor people provide market for inferior
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/01/2011 for the course SOC 214 taught by Professor Weisse during the Summer '11 term at Holyoke CC.

Page1 / 61

Chapter6 - Chapter 6 Poverty and Economic Inequality...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online