22.comp.biodegradation.10

22.comp.biodegradation.10 - Naphthalene in Coho Salmon and...

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Fate Processes in Non-Mammalian Species Introduction to Metabolic Fate Fate Processes in Invertebrates Fate Processes in Vertebrates Conclusions
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I. Introduction to Metabolic Fate
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Benefits of Metabolic Processes Reactions often directly detoxify a chemical. Reactions almost always increase water solubility of a chemical. However, there are exceptions – would aquatic organisms be more or less likely to rely on metabolic processes to eliminate xenobiotics?
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Phase I and II Processes
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II. Fate Processes in Invertebrates Cytochrome P450
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PCP in the Purple Sea Urchin
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PCP in the Green Abalone and Pacific Oyster
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p -Nitrophenol in the Red Abalone and Turban Snail
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Methyl Palmitate in Dungeness Crab
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III. Fate Processes in Vertebrates
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PCP in Topsmelt and Striped Bass
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p -Nitrophenol in White Sturgeon
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Unformatted text preview: Naphthalene in Coho Salmon and Striped Bass Molinate in White Sturgeon and Carp Fenitrothion in Rainbow Trout Amino Acid Conjugation and Flounder Phase I and II Processes – Revisited! IV. Conclusions Reactions are similar to those observed in mammals. Advantages include decreased potency and increased water solubility. Cats (Felidae) cannot glycosylate, dogs (Canidae) cannot acetylate, and pigs (Suidae) cannot perform sulfation. Low metabolic rates in aquatic organisms arise from minimal need for water conservation. AA conjugation is via glycine, glutamine and taurine (flatfish). For glycosylation, plants and invertebrates use glucose while vertebrates use glucuronic acid....
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This note was uploaded on 06/29/2011 for the course GENETICS 101 taught by Professor Debrakimbrell during the Summer '09 term at UC Davis.

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22.comp.biodegradation.10 - Naphthalene in Coho Salmon and...

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