ec4 - Introduction In the recent experiment, the overall...

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Introduction In the recent experiment, the overall objective was to understand the error associated with the multi-meters. The nominal value of each resistor used was recorded. The actual value was measured with a digital multi-meter. Also, an analog multi-meter was used to measure the voltage across two resistors. During this experiment formulas from previous laboratory experiments were used. These formulas were Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law, Kirchhoff’s Current Law, and Ohm’s law (Ohm’s law is shown by equation one). Lab required that the ideas of combining resistors in series or in parallel circuits be applied. The equation for voltage division was used in this laboratory to calculate the voltage across each resistor in the circuit. Voltage division was applied in series circuits. = V IR (Eq.1) = + + 1Req 1R1 1R2 1R2 1Rn (Eq. 2) = + + Req R1 R2 R3 Rn (Eq. 3) = + Req R1R2R1 R2 (Eq.4) = + = + V1 VsR1R1 R2 and V2 VsR2R1 R2 (Eq.5) The circuit being analyzed is circuit 1,shown in Figure 1. on pg. 2, and consists of a D.C. voltage source and three sets of two resistors in parallel to each set. 1
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Figure 1. Circuit 1 The voltage across of the resistors in series was calculated by using voltage division. The currents in each branch were calculated by using ohm’s law and a series combination of resistors in each branch. Voltmeters connected across a resistor provide a second path for the current to flow through. The voltmeter has an internal resistance. The current flowing through the branches that did not contain the voltmeter were increased. The current flowing through the branch that contained the voltmeter were decreased. The equivalent resistance of the meter and the resistor were calculated using the equivalent resistance formulas. Then the voltage across the resistor and voltmeter were calculated by using voltage division. The formulas for voltage division and equivalent resistances were given.
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This note was uploaded on 06/30/2011 for the course ENGR 403 taught by Professor Ahn during the Spring '11 term at Birmingham-Southern College.

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ec4 - Introduction In the recent experiment, the overall...

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