Notes Chapter 7 - Chapter 7: The Teacher's Role as a...

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Chapter 7: The Teacher's Role as a Socializing Agent According to Albert Bandura (1986), children imitate adults who: Are warm Have prestige Have control over resources Have the potential to reinforce or punish behavior Each student comes to school with a unique set of characteristics: Family background Learning style Abilities, motives, and interests. The teacher comes to school with certain abilities and characteristics, too: Teaching style Management techniques Expectations Leadership Styles Authoritarian Style- Teacher directs the group Group is discontented, hostile, but productive Laissez-faire (permissive) Style Teacher only responds to requests Group is discontented, bored, and non-productive Democratic Style Teacher guides and collaborates Group is content, cooperative, and productive Teacher’s Management Style Preventative measures work better than consequences for undesirable behavior Students' inattentiveness and misbehavior are often linked to the teacher's performance and preparation (or lack thereof) Teachers are more successful at managing behavior when they Respond immediately to incidents Quash minor problems before they become major problems
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This note was uploaded on 06/30/2011 for the course SOC 15 taught by Professor Mccord during the Summer '11 term at Irvine Valley College.

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Notes Chapter 7 - Chapter 7: The Teacher's Role as a...

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