Lifespan Nutritional Needs Present

Lifespan Nutritional Needs Present - Lifespan Nutritional...

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Lifespan Nutritional Needs Present Lifespan Nutritional Needs Present Ronda L. Brewer SCI/241 May 12, 2011 Jeremy Hawkins
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Good nutrition plays a positive role in good health, self-sufficiency, and quality of life. An individual’s dietary intake will be affected as they undergo changes in their lives and move from one stage of life to the next. Adequate nutrition is necessary to maintain cognitive and physical functioning, to prevent, reduce, and manage chronic disease and disease-related disabilities, and to sustain health and a good quality of life (Menu and Nutrition Requriements). To meet the body’s daily nutritional needs while minimizing risk for chronic disease, an AMDR, Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range, was established for carbohydrate to be 45-65% of total calories, for fat, 20-35% of total calories, and for protein, 10-35% of total calories. It is also suggested that no more than 25% of total calories come from added sugars (Menu and Nutrition Requriements). The RDA is the average daily dietary intake level that is sufficient to meet the nutrient requirement for nearly all healthy individuals of a specified age range and gender. The following presentation will outline the nutrition needs for both a man and a woman throughout the various stages of life. Food provides the energy and nutrients that a body needs to be healthy. Breast milk and formula provide adequate nutrition for an infant. They both contain all the necessary vitamins and minerals for a baby. Children under the age of 2 need up to 50 percent of their calories to come from fat. Whole milk is a good source for fat after age one (Infant and Toddler Nutrition). But, after age two or three, you can switch to low-fat milk. As an infant grows, the daily recommended intakes of protein, fat, and water increase at small incremental rates. This occurs because their weight increases at a gradual pace; therefore, their nutritional values for each day also increase. After age one, it is important to watch out for iron deficiency. Iron deficiency can affect a child’s physical, mental, and behavioral development, and also can lead to anemia (Feeding Your 1- o 2-Year-Old, 2008). 500 mg of calcium is recommended for toddlers between the age of one and three. After the age of three, dietary fiber
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Lifespan Nutritional Needs Present is important because it might prevent diseases later on. Do not feed a baby eggs, citrus fruits and juices, cow’s milk or honey until after the age of one, and no seafood, peanuts or tree nuts before age two or three. A healthy diet helps children grow and learn and also helps to prevent obesity and weight-related diseases, such as diabetes.
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This note was uploaded on 07/02/2011 for the course SCI 241 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Lifespan Nutritional Needs Present - Lifespan Nutritional...

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